HomeBest of 202211 Best Squat Racks to Buy in 2022

11 Best Squat Racks to Buy in 2022

A squat rack is one of the most important pieces of equipment in any gym. With a squat rack, a barbell, some weight plates, and a weight bench, you can perform hundreds of exercises to build muscle and get stronger. I consider these pieces to be a part of the ‘core four”, which are the essentials for most gyms.

Squat racks can range in size, price, features, attachment compatibility, strength, quality, etc… which can be a challenge when narrowing down a list of potential options.

In this article, I'll take you through some of the best squat racks to buy in 2022. Whether you're a powerlifter, a CrossFitter, an Olympic weightlifter, or just somebody who wants to stay fit, this article will cover it all.

Each rack that I have outlined here has either been personally owned/used by me or has been meticulously researched through spec comparisons, user reviews, and feedback from people I trust.

Let's dig in!

Best Squat Racks in 2022


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Best Power Rack

REP PR-5000 v2

REP PR-5000 V2 Cover - Red 6-Post Rack

Price: Starting at $945.93 w/ Free Shipping
Tube Size: 3×3 11-Gauge
Hardware Size: 1″
Hole Spacing: 2″
Footprint: 39″-69.5″ long x 50.5″ wide
Height: 80″ or 93″
Numbered Uprights: Yes
Color: Multiple
Made in: China

Pros

  • Highly configurable with front and side holes
  • Two depth and height options
  • Available with four or six posts
  • Lat pulldown/low row attachment adds a lot of variety
  • Available in multiple colors matched to other REP products
  • 47″ outside upright width

Cons

  • Metric system is slightly smaller than the imperial system, so some US attachments may not fit
  • Some attachments, while still nice, aren't as refined as some US-made attachments
Best Power Rack
REP PR-5000 Power Rack
4.9

The REP PR-5000 is a top-notch power rack with excellent features including 3x3 uprights, 1" holes, strong attachment compatibility, and more...

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The REP PR-5000v2 is a rack that I've owned for over a year. It's well-made, aesthetic, and it includes several nice attachments, including the lat pulldown/low row. In general, I'm a big fan of 3×3 racks with 1″ holes because they get the best attachments and it's the way the market is moving overall. When you factor in the money, the PR-5000 is a great option.

This rack can be purchased as a four-post rack or as a six-post rack with either a 30″ or 41″ interior depth. Either depth is more than enough to accommodate lifters. You can also purchase the rack in an 80″ or 93″ height. I highly recommend the 93″ height unless your ceiling clearance won't allow for it. The taller height gives you more hole options for attachments and it provides a fuller range of motion on pull-ups.

One of my favorite features of the PR-5000 is the outside upright width of 47″. This gives you more room to cleanly rack and un-rack your bar with little concern of clipping the uprights with your plates. Compare this to Rogue, which uses a 49″ width on their 3×3 racks. That extra inch on each side sits closer to the plates, which can lead to you hitting the uprights.

If you purchase the four-post rack, you will need to either bolt it down or use the front foot extensions. My PR-5000 was purchased and originally built as a 6-post rack, but I've since converted it into a half rack with shorter 16″ crossmembers (same as plate storage crossmembers) and the front foot extensions. It includes the lat pulldown/low row and plate storage, and it's absolutely rock solid.

While this rack claims to be 3×3 with 1″ holes, that isn't entirely accurate as REP uses the metric system vs. the imperial system (US-made racks). Therefore the uprights are actually 2.95×2.95 and the holes are around 0.98″. This will affect certain US-made attachments. Single pin attachments work just fine. For example, I can use Rogue Fitness j-cups on the REP rack without issue. Attachments that span multiple holes, however, will potentially not work since the hole spacing is slightly shorter. Each hole includes laser-cut numbers for easy identification.

REP has numerous accessories, including various safety options, different J-cups, ISO arms, the lat pulldown/low, etc… Overall, it's a highly configurable rack that will function great and look great.


Best Half Rack

Rogue Monster Lite Half Rack

Rogue Monster Lite Half Rack

Price: $1,200
Tube Size: 3×3 11-Gauge
Hardware Size: 5/8″
Hole Spacing: Westside (1″) through bench zone and 2″ above
Footprint: 55″ or 62″ long x 53″ wide
Height: 90.375″
Numbered Uprights: Yes
Color: Black
Made in: USA

Pros

  • On-rack plate storage as standard
  • Compatible with many attachments
  • Front foot extensions eliminate the need to bolt down
  • Two depth options
  • Westside hole spacing

Cons

  • Only available in black
  • Fewer side holes than front holes limits some attachment configurations
Best Half Rack
Rogue Monster Lite Half Rack
4.7

The Rogue Monster Lite Half Rack is USA-made, high-quality squat rack with 3x3 uprights, 5x8" holes, plate storage, and numerous attachments.

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The Monster Lite Half Rack is a new addition to Rogue's half rack lineup. This rack includes several nice features, including Westside spacing, 3×3 uprights, a Rogue nameplate, etc…

The best thing about a half rack, in my opinion, is that you get efficient on-rack plate storage in a footprint similar to a four-post power rack. Not only that, but you don't have to bolt the rack down, although you have the option if you want. The front foot extensions work to stabilize the rack so that you can effectively lift off the front uprights and do pull-ups. These extensions include side holes so you can use band pegs. If you're planning to perform banded movements, then you will want to bolt the rack down.

All Monster Lite racks from Rogue are built with 3×3 uprights and include 5/8″ holes. This is a very common hole size and there are a lot of attachments available through Rogue and elsewhere. Monster Lite racks also include Westside hole spacing, which is 1″ on center through the bench zone. This helps dial-in bar placement on the bench press. The rack includes laser-cut numbers on every other hole through Westside and then all holes above, which are spaced 2″ on center.

The Monster Lite Half Rack can be purchased in two depths: 17″ or 24″. My recommendation is to go with the 17″ to save on space. The 24″ option doesn't give you more functionality unless you want to lift inside and you don't have plates stored on the back. The rack comes with the weight storage pegs as well as a pull-up bar, J-cups, band pegs, and the front foot extensions. You can also purchase the safety spotter arms on the product page, which is highly recommended.

Aesthetically, this half rack looks outstanding. While I would like to see more color options like on some of the other Monster Lite racks, the all-black look is very nice. I also really like the Rogue all-black nameplate.


Best Wall-Mounted Rack

PRX Profile Pro Squat Rack

PRX Profile Pro Squat Rack - Best Squat Rack

Price: Starting at $849
Tube Size: 3×3
Hardware Size: 1″
Hole Spacing: 2″
Footprint: 26.75″ Long x 52″ wide
Height: 73″, 90″, or 96″
Numbered Uprights: Yes
Color: Multiple
Made in: USA

Pros

  • Available in three height options
  • Three styles of pull-up bars to choose from
  • Very durable and backed by an excellent reputation
  • Accepts many different attachments
  • Extremely space friendly
  • Available in 10 different colors

Cons

  • PRX racks fold down instead of out, which increases height clearance
  • Most expensive wall-mount option
Best Wall-Mounted Rack
PRX Profile Pro Squat Rack
4.9

The PRX Profile Pro is a patented and quality USA-made wall-mounted rack. It includes 3x3 uprights, 1" holes, numerous attachments, & more...

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PRX became a household name in the equipment space after landing a deal with Mr. Wonderful on Shark Tank in 2016. The once two-person business exploded into the premier wall-mounted rack manufacturer. These made-in-the-USA folding racks are very high-quality and they include impressive specs and attachment compatibility.

The reason I picked the Profile PRO over the Profile ONE from PRX is that it's made with 3×3 11-gauge steel and 1″ holes and it comes in a variety of colors. While the 2×3 Profile ONE is plenty sturdy, it doesn't come with Westside hole spacing, which is one of the biggest reasons to go with a 2×3 rack. With this rack being a true 3×3 rack with 1″ holes and 2″ spacing, outside attachment compatibility is strong. PRX, of course, also sells attachments, including dip bars, spotter arms, pulley systems, benches, and more. The uprights also include laser-cut numbers for easy identification.

The biggest reason to go with a wall-mounted rack is to save space. They're especially popular in garages where owners still want to park a car. The Profile PRO sits between 9″ and 22.5″ off the wall when folded up depending on which version you purchase. These versions are separated by their different pull-up and height options. You can buy without a pull-up bar, with a standard pull-up bar, with a multi-grip pull-up bar, or with a kipping pull-up bar. When folded out, the racks will sit from 26.75″ to 39.5″ inches from the ground. All of them are 52″ wide, which includes the bracket.

The unique design of the PRX folding racks is that they fold down instead of out as you see on others. Those ‘fold-out' racks, mind you, came to exist after PRX invented their ‘fold-down' rack. While this method creates very fast and easy action, it does increase height demands. For example, a 90″ Profile Pro rack will require 108″ of actual ceiling height.

Assembly of wall-mounted racks can be a little tricky, but PRX has solutions in place to help people with uneven stud spacing, ceiling clearance issues, baseboard bump-outs, etc… They also have videos available to walk you through the general assembly process. The brackets are built to accommodate 16″ or 24″ stud spacing, but you can also use a stringer/ledger board to mount.

If you're looking for the best folding rack, PRX is going to be very hard to beat given their quality and excellent track record.


Best Squat Stand

Rogue SML-2C Squat Stand

Rogue SML-2C Squat Rack - Best Squat Rack

Price: $495-$545
Tube Size: 3×3
Hardware Size: Westside (1″) through bench zone and 2″ above
Hole Spacing: 2″
Footprint: 48″ Long x 49″ Wide
Height: 92″
Numbered Uprights: Optional
Color: Multiple
Made in: USA

Pros

  • Flat foot base eliminates the need to bolt down
  • Includes a pull-up bar
  • Accommodates many different attachments
  • Westside hole spacing
  • Rated to 1,000 lbs +

Cons

  • Some attachments are not possible as a limitation to squat stands
  • Spotter arms not included
Best Squat Stand
Rogue SML-2C Squat Stand
4.9

The Rogue SML-2C is a multi-colored squat stand with 3x3 uprights, 5/8" holes, Westside spacing, and more.

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The Rogue SML-2C is a part of their Monster Lite squat stand lineup. It's built the same as the SML-2, but it includes multiple color options and laser-cut numbers. With Westside spacing, numerous attachments, and over 800 4.9/5 star reviews, there's a lot to like about this squat stand.

One of the biggest advantages of a squat stand is its footprint. The Rogue SML-2C is only 48″ long x 49″ wide, making it a strong option for the space-constrained lifter who wants a standalone rack at a solid price. This rack, like other squat stands, includes a flat foot base which means you don't have to bolt it down. You can, however, purchase the floor mounting attachment if you want extra stability. This is a great option if you perform kipping pull-ups or banded movements. The stand is rated to hold over 1,000 lbs, so there is little concern over its overall strength and stability.

Like the Monster Lite Half Rack above, the SML-2C is built with 3×3 steel and uses 5/8″ hardware. Westside spacing through the bench zone helps fine-tune starting position and 2″ spacing above is standard. With this squat stand, you have the option to include laser-cut numbers for an additional $50. This will include every other hole through the bench zone and every hole above. If it fits your budget, I would recommend the numbers. They help line up attachments easily, especially in the tighter-spaced Westside area.

While some squat stands don't come with a pull-up bar, the SML-2C does. You can pick either the standard pull-up bar or the fat/skinny pull-up bar. With a max height of 88″ and 80.5″, respectively, this gives most users adequate height to perform full range of motion pull-ups.

This stand can be purchased in 11 different colors, which is a great benefit over the SML-2 as well as the more expensive SM-series squat stands.  Regardless of which color you pick, the base will be black, but this creates a nice-looking two-tone aesthetic.

You will need to purchase the spotter arms with the rack if you choose to do so. I would recommend them for safety. Overall, the SML-2C from Rogue offers tremendous value for a well-spec'd and very-well reviewed squat stand.


Best Budget Power Rack

REP PR-1100

REP PR-1100 Cover

Price: $359.99 w/ Free Shipping
Tube Size: 2×2
Hardware Size: 1″
Hole Spacing: 3″
Footprint: 48″ Long x 58″ Wide
Height: 82″ or 84″
Numbered Uprights: Yes
Color: Multiple
Made in: China

Pros

  • Excellent value at under $400 shipped
  • Lat pulldown/low attachment increases versatility
  • Available in four colors
  • Includes multi-grip pull-up bar as standard
  • Flat foot base does not require bolting down

Cons

  • 2×2 uprights with 3″ spacing limits outside attachment compatibility
  • Expect some sway when performing dips and re-racking heavy squats
  • 3″ hole spacing may create awkward starting positions on some lifts for some users
Best Budget Power Rack
REP PR-1100 Power Rack
5.0

The REP PR-1100 is a great budget-friendly power rack. It's ideal for beginner lifters or those who are just starting their home gym.

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The REP PR-1100 is the most economically-priced rack in REP's catalog. With multiple colors, a flat foot design, a lat pulldown/low row attachment, and a price of under $400 shipped, it's hard to ignore the value it delivers. This rack is ideal for budget-minded lifters, beginner lifters, or recreational lifters.

In terms of construction, the PR-1100 is built with 2×2 14-gauge steel, which creates a weight capacity of 700 lbs. This power rack has a flat-foot design, which means you don't have to bolt it into the ground. Being a lighter rack, you will notice some more sway when performing dips or racking a heavy squat, but structurally, it's very safe. If you add the weight storage section and/or the lat pulldown/low row attachment, the stability increases significantly and you're still in the budget zone.

The PR-1100 uses 1″ holes and they're spaced 3″ apart. This isn't uncommon for a budget rack, but when combined with the 2×2 upright, your attachment compatibility from outside companies is more limited. REP does sell the lat attachment, the weight storage, a dip attachment, and a landmine, so you're still getting a versatile system at an affordable price.

The safety system on this rack is a simple chrome-plated pin, but it's unique in two ways. The first is that it extends out from the rack by about 4.5″, which essentially serves as another J-cup or barbell holder. The second is that it's used to facilitate the dip attachment.

The footprint on the PR-1100 will appeal to those working in smaller spaces. Most of the rack is 48″ wide except for the rear stabilizer, which is 58″. The total depth is 48″ not including the lat pulldown attachment or weight storage. The height will either be 84″ or 82″ depending on which way you have the multi-grip pull-up bar facing. The multi-grip pull-up is one of the best features of this rack. Most budget racks only have a single pull-up bar, so to get something with multiple options is a huge plus. It offers neutral grips in addition to straight grips and angled grips for lat training. One side is 1.25″ in diameter while the other is 2″, so you can also train two grip styles.

All-in-all, for the money, it's hard to beat the PR-1100. This is simply a great budget power rack. For more, you can read my full PR-1100 review.


Best Power Rack for Beginners

Titan T-3 Power Rack

Titan T-3 Power Rack Cover

Price: Starting at $489.99 w/ Free Shipping
Tube Size: 2×3
Hardware Size: 11/16″
Hole Spacing: Westside (1″) through bench zone and 2″ above
Footprint: 32.75″ or 44.75″ Long x 54″ Wide
Height: 82″ or 91″
Numbered Uprights: No
Color: Black
Made in: China

Pros

  • Available in two depth options and two height options
  • Westside hole spacing
  • Accepts a lot of attachments from Titan and other companies
  • Comes standard with two different pull-up bars
  • Rated to over 1,000 lbs

Cons

  • Needs to be bolted down
  • Metric system is slightly smaller than the imperial system, so some US attachments may not fit
  • Only available in black
Best Power Rack for Beginners
Titan T-3 Power Rack
4.9

The Titan T-3 Power Rack is a solid entry-level rack option that you can grow into. It's built with 2x3 uprights, 5/8" holes, and Westside spacing.

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The Titan T-3 Power Rack is modeled after the old-school Westside racks. This is a low-profile rack that's strong, versatile, and inexpensive. Beginner lifters looking for a rack they can grow into will love this rack, but it's also suitable for lifters of all levels given its 1,000 lb capacity and other features.

The T-3 from Titan is constructed with 2×3 11-gauge steel and it has a very small footprint. Buyers can pick between a 24″ depth or a 36″ depth as well as an 82″ or 91″ height. Unless space is challenging, I would recommend the 36″ depth and 91″ height. The Westside guys lift no problem in a 24″ rack, but it can feel claustrophobic for some people. The 91″ height will also allow most lifters to achieve a full range of motion on pull-ups.

With this being a small footprint four-post rack, it is highly recommended that you bolt it down to the ground or a platform. This creates rock-solid stability and it eliminates the risk of the rack tipping (mainly if performing kipping pull-ups or squatting heavy off the front of the rack).

The T-3 uses 11/16″ holes, due to the metric system, but it's very close to the 5/8″ holes used on imperial-based racks. Being that these holes are slightly larger, you can use US attachments on the T-3, but there may be a very small amount of wiggle. The great thing about this rack, and Titan in general, is that they make dozens of attachments so you should have no issue creating a very versatile unit.

You will also find Westside hole spacing on the T-3, which is great for smaller bench adjustments. Above and below you will have 2″ spacing on center, which is standard. The rack comes with two pull-up bars: a 1.25″ diameter bar and a 2″ bar.

With prices starting under $500 shipped, the Titan T-3 represents great value for a rack that can be loaded with attachments.


Best Squat Rack for Small Spaces

Bridge Built Phoenix Rack

Bridge Built Phoenix Rack - Best Squat Rack

Price: Starting at $699
Tube Size: 3×3 11-Gauge
Hardware Size: 3/4″
Hole Spacing: 2″
Footprint: 48″ Long x 49″ Wide (when opened)
Height: 75″, 87″, or 99″
Numbered Uprights: Yes
Color: Multiple
Made in: USA

Pros

  • Unique folding design makes it extremely space-friendly
  • Available in many color options
  • Outstanding craftsmanship
  • Available in three different heights and with a pull-up bar
  • Optional wheel kit makes for easy portability
  • Very stable under heavy load

Cons

  • 3/4″ holes limit outside attachment compatibility
  • Folding and unfolding can be somewhat awkward
Best Squat Rack for Small Spaces
Bridge Built Phoenix Rack
4.7

The Bridge Built Phoenix Rack is a revolutionary squat rack that folds into a very small (12" wide) footprint. It's built with 3x3 uprights and 3/4" holes.

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The Bridge Built Phoenix rack is an industry-first squat stand with a unique folding design. If you don't want to wall-mount a squat rack, this is the best option for small spaces. I've owned this rack since it was launched in 2020 – it's strong, it's small, and the craftsmanship is outstanding.

Most squat stands have a fixed footprint that's very similar to the Phoenix rack (when opened). This rack measures 48″ long and 49″ wide, but where it shines is its ability to fold up to a mere 12″ in width. In the middle of the rear support crossmember is a handle with two independent articulating sides. simple hitch pins keep them secure when in use, but once removed, lifters can pull up on the handle and collapse the rack for amazing space savings. It can sometimes require a little elbow grease, but for the most part, it's a seamless operation, and the end result speaks for itself.

The Phoenix rack can be purchased in multiple heights, including 75″, 87″, or 99″. If you want to add their adjustable pull-up bar, the 87″ height is recommended at a minimum. This rack uses 3×3 uprights and 3/4″ holes spaced 2″ on center. This hole size isn't very common, so attachment compatibility from outside companies is limited. That said, Bridge Built does sell several attachments, including safety spotters, dip bars, landmines, leg rollers, etc… I'll also add that their attachments are visually beautiful with a polycarbonate liner that exposes the steel or custom underlay beneath.

A great feature of the Phoenix rack, and something I 100% recommend, is the option to add a wheel set. This makes it much easier to maneuver around your gym. Another interesting and unique feature of this squat stand is the addition of carabiner holes in the uprights. Every third hole there are smaller holes on the edges of the front and outer side. These holes let you clip in a carabiner for things like Crossover Symmetry, etc…

A common question with this rack is how stable and durable it is. Rest assured, this rack is capable of handling the same load that any squat stand can. There are videos of Jujimufu lifting 700 lbs on the Phoenix rack with no sight of even the slightest concern. Another video shows 520 lbs being dropped on the safety arms – again, no concern.

Overall, the Phoenix Rack is a high-quality, USA-made squat stand with unmatched space savings.


Best Premium Power Rack

Sorinex XL Power Rack

Sorinex XL Power Rack - Best Squat Rack

Price: Starting at $2,849
Tube Size: 3×3 11-Gauge
Hardware Size: 1″
Hole Spacing: 2″
Footprint: 76.5″ Long x 47″ Wide
Height: 98.4″
Numbered Uprights: Optional
Color: Multiple
Made in: USA

Pros

  • Exceptionally well-made
  • Very versatile and capable of accepting many attachments
  • 47″ outside upright width
  • Multiple pull-up bar options
  • Available in dozens of colors
  • Extremely customizable with logos, colors, etc…

Cons

  • You must work with a Sorinex rep to purchase a Sorinex rack
  • Among the most expensive power racks on the market
Best Premium Power Rack
Sorinex XL Power Rack
5.0

The Sorinex XL Power Rack is a custom option that includes a very high-quality rack with 3x3 uprights, 1" holes, and a ton of accessories.

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Ah, my pride and joy – the Sorinex XL Power Rack. I've owned this rack since the beginning of 2019 and it has just been a pleasure to have in my gym. The experience, the quality, the customization, the configuration possibilities, etc… it's simply an amazing power rack.

Sorinex has made a name for itself as being a leader in the equipment space, particularly on the facilities side. They create massive rooms for professional sports teams, collegiate sports teams, the military, etc… that reputation trickled into the home gym space, and now they're carving out an impressive niche in high-end custom home gyms.

The XL Power Rack is not the highest-end rack that Sorinex offers. That honor goes to the Base Camp, but the XL is, in my opinion, the best for home gyms. This is a 3×3 rack with 1″ holes and 2″ spacing on center. It accepts dozens of innovative Sorinex attachments and accessories, as well as those from several other manufacturers. Some of the attachments that Sorinex is known for include their jammer arms, bulldog pad, utility seat, several pull-up varieties, and much more.

The XL Power Rack is a six-post rack, but Sorinex also makes the XL as a four-post rack, a half rack, a double rack, and more. This six-post version includes a dedicated weight storage area and a lifting area that measures 43″ deep. The total footprint is 76.5″ long, 47″ wide, and just over 95″ tall. 47″ width, as mentioned above, is a great advantage because of the extra barbell clearance. It's one of the main reasons I picked this rack.

Sorinex sells the XL rack in a standard package that includes several attachments, including safety straps, j-cups, plate storage, etc… They also sell their Uber package, which includes numerous premium attachments such as sandwich cups, all three safety options, leg roller pads, a landmine, bar storage, utility seat, and a custom logo arch. This comes with a steep price premium, but it's a route worth looking into if you decide to go with Sorinex. I purchased the Uber package myself, and it's been terrific.

The customization component of working with Sorinex is one of the biggest selling points. These are made-to-order custom racks, which means you can't just buy them on their website. You will need to work with a rep, which some people will like and others won't. I like it myself, as it creates a unique experience. Customization can include logos in various places, specific colors, integrated LED lights, specialized accessories, and more. With a made-to-order rack also comes longer lead times. You can expect up to 18 weeks for delivery. Shipping costs are also higher with Sorinex, which can be quite a bit more than higher volume manufacturers.

If you're looking for a bespoke rack, or even just a very well-made American rack, Sorinex is a great choice. For more, read my full Sorinex XL review.


Most Versatile Power Rack

Prime Prodigy HLP Rack

Prime Fitness Prodigy HLP Rack - Best Squat Rack

Price: Starting at $5,500
Tube Size: 3×3 11-Gauge
Hardware Size: 1″
Hole Spacing: 2″
Footprint: 62″ Long x 57″ Wide
Height: 92″
Numbered Uprights: Yes
Color: Multiple
Made in: USA

Pros

  • Available with plate-loaded or selectorized weight stacks
  • 1:1 ratio on high pulleys for lat pulldowns
  • Dual columns with 1″ holes and 2″ spacing allow for crossover work
  • 2:1 ratio on adjustable columns
  • high-quality attachments, including low row feet and lat pulldown seat
  • Excellent craftsmanship

Cons

  • Expensive for the average home gym owner
  • No side holes limit attachment compatibility
Most Versatile Power Rack
Prime Fitness Prodigy Rack

The Prime Prodigy Rack is a very versatile rack with a functional trainer, lat pulldown, low row, 3x3 uprights, 1" holes, and much more.

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The Prodigy Rack from Prime Fitness really helped propel their name in the equipment space, particularly in the home gym space. Prime has been making great equipment, particularly machines, before this, but this rack elevated their presence. With dual adjustable columns, dual fixed high pulleys, on-rack attachments, etc… its versatility is impressive.

While I don't own the full rack, I have owned the Prime Prodigy Single Stack since early 2020, which is essentially just one-half of this rack. You can watch my video review above for a closer look. Everything is the same spec-wise, function-wise, cable-wise, etc… except the single stack cannot also be a rack.

The first thing to note about the HLP rack is that it can be purchased as a plate-loaded rack or as a selectorized rack. I prefer selectorized because adjustment speed is much faster than loading plates. The plate-loaded version is slightly cheaper and it does offer one advantage in that you can switch from a 2:1 ratio to a 4:1 ratio on the adjustable column with the pull of a pin. On the selectorized version, you order one of the two and that's what it is permanently. I recommend 2:1, which means you will feel 50% of the stated weight as opposed to 25% on the 4:1. Depending on which you pick, the high pulley will either be 1:1 or 2:1. This is another reason I recommend 2:1 on the adjustable column since it creates a 1:1 ratio up top.

The selectorized version of the Prime HLP rack includes two 350lb weight stacks, which is more than any other unit currently on the market. This is where those ratios come into play. On a 1:1 high pulley, you can actually feel 350 lbs of resistance.

The rack itself is constructed with 3×3 11-gauge steel and it uses 1″ holes and 2″ spacing on center. The beauty of this piece is that the uprights have sliding cables and they accommodate key attachments. For example, you can attach their lat pulldown seat to perform pulldowns or their low row feet to perform back rows, etc… This type of versatility makes the HLP rack one of the best racks on the market, period. The one downside, however, is that it doesn't include side holes. By not having a 4-way hole design, it does reject some outside attachments, but many will still work. Prime also sells nearly 20 attachments for this rack.

The rack ships freight and it will arrive partially assembled. The rest of the assembly is relatively straightforward – it's recommended to have 1-2 other people help. The assembled unit measures 62″ long, 57″ wide, and 92″ high, which is fairly space-friendly considering everything you get with it.

If you're looking for the best power rack with cables, the Prime HLP rack is a top contender to be sure.


Best Combo Rack for Powerlifters

Rogue Combo Rack

Rogue Combo Rack - Best Squat Rack

Price: $2,770
Tube Size: 3×3 7-Gauge
Hardware Size: N/A
Hole Spacing: 1″
Footprint: 60.4″ Long x 80.25″ Wide
Height: 29.46″-68.41″
Numbered Uprights: Yes
Color: Black
Made in: USA

Pros

  • Jack system makes adjustments quick and easy
  • The drop-in bench can be quickly added or removed
  • Angled feet create a very stable base
  • Uprights can be angled for various grip positions
  • Accommodates vast majority of user heights with dozens of hole options
  • IPF approved

Cons

  • Takes up more space (width) than other squat racks
  • Not as versatile as other squat racks
Best Combo Rack for Powerlifters
Rogue Combo Rack
4.7

The Rogue Combo Rack is an ideal rack option for competitive powerlifters looking to perform the squat and bench press.

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If you're a competitive powerlifter, specificity may be important to you. With combo racks being the IPF standard for competition, what better way to train than with an actual combo rack. The Rogue combo rack, for the money, represents a great option. It's IPF approved and it has received extremely positive feedback from users – even those who have used more expensive options.

The biggest advantage of a combo rack, aside from specificity in competitive training, is how quickly it can be adjusted. You can go from benching to squatting very quickly and you can adjust the height of the J-cups and the safeties very quickly as well. These adjustments are made possible with a jack system – the beauty of which doesn't require you to unload the barbell – isn't leverage cool?!

Another advantage to combo racks is the ability to angle the uprights inward, which lets lifters use a wider grip on the bar for squatting. On the Rogue combo rack, you can angle them in 5 degrees or leave them in the vertical position. These uprights are constructed with 3×3 7-gauge steel with laser-cut numbering and the adjustable tubes are made of stainless steel.

The adjustable tubes can range in height off the floor on bench press from 29.46″ to 57.46″ and on squats from 40.41″ to 68.41.” The drop-in bench includes the Competition Thompson Fat Pad and it sits an IPF-spec'd 17.5″ off the ground. This bench also includes a large spotter deck for those PR attempts.

A downside to combo racks is that they take up more space than many squat racks. Due to its wide, angled base, it measures over 80″ in width. Its length is manageable at ~60″ and its height is no issue for any room. Another disadvantage of a combo rack is that it's not nearly as versatile as a squat rack. This is made for squatting and benching only.

At the end of the day, combo racks are ideal for competitive powerlifters, but they may not be necessary unless you want to train exactly as you will compete or if you train multiple lifters at the same time.


Best All-in-One Squat Rack

Force USA G6

Force USA G6 - Best Squat Racks

Price: $4,499.99 (use code LAB5 to save 5%)
Tube Size: Varies
Hardware Size: 1″
Hole Spacing: 3″
Footprint: 63″ Long x 72″ Wide
Height: 91″
Numbered Uprights: No
Color: Black
Made in: Import

Pros

  • Extremely versatile with 17 different included attachments
  • 2x 220lb weight stacks with a 2:1 ratio
  • Dual columns allow for crossover work
  • Includes a Smith machine
  • Accessories and attachments all store neatly on the unit

Cons

  • Wider hole spacing makes it harder to fine-tune starting position
  • Assembly required, but third party assembly services are available
Best All-in-One Squat Rack
Force USA G6 All-In-One Trainer
4.6

The Force USA G6 is a Swiss Army squat rack with loads of versatility, including a functional trainer, smith machine, leg press, and more...

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Where to start… that's how I feel about All-in-One trainers because… well, they do a lot. Force USA has one of the best reputations on the market when it comes to all-in-one trainers. They currently offer two plate-loaded trainers and three selectorized trainers. The G6 is the most economical of the three selectorized versions.

The G6 All-in-One Trainer includes two 220lb weight stacks that are connected to dual adjustable columns. This allows users to perform a variety of movements ranging from lat pulldowns to cable curls, and everything in between. These pulleys carry a 2:1 ratio, so you'll feel 50% of the stated load. The max effective load, is therefore 110 lbs. This is adequate for many bodybuilding/accessory movements, but lat pulldowns and low rows may feel too light to some users. The more expensive G12 is another option, which includes dual 200 lb stacks but with a 1:1 ratio.

In addition to the cable options, the G6 also includes a Smith Machine with 12 locking positions. The Smith is rated to over 770 lbs and it does include a safety system that can be adjusted based on the lift you're performing.

The front uprights act as a normal power rack with 2×3 steel and 1″ holes. These do have wider spacing than most racks, but Force USA has all the attachments that you need for their all-in-one trainer. In fact, they provide all 17 as standard, which includes things like safety spotters, a low row plate/leg press, a lat pulldown leg attachment, a dip attachment, various handles, and more… At the top of the rack are two independent multi-grip pull-up bars as well as a center ring for suspension trainers like TRX.

The footprint of the G6 is surprisingly compact considering everything you get. It measures 63″ long, 72″ wide, and 91″ tall. The unit will ship in two boxes and assembly is required. At a minimum, you should get some help from another person, but there is also the option for third-party assembly. It may be something to consider depending on your skills, the amount of time you have, and your temperament.


Types of Squat Racks

Best Squat Racks - REP PR-5000 - Garage Gym Lab

Power Racks

Power racks, or power cages, are the most popular type of squat rack. These can range in size and features, and generally speaking, they're the best for most people. Power racks typically include a variety of holes for different types of attachments that can provide a lot of versatility in your training. They also include at least one fixed pull-up option, and their safety options are the most comprehensive of all squat racks.

If you have the space for a full-size power rack (four or six posts), I would recommend one as the top squat rack choice.

Half Racks

Half racks are very similar to power racks except that they're smaller. A great benefit of most half racks is they include on-rack plate storage, which can be challenging on a four-post power rack. With a half rack, you'll always be lifting “outside of the rack”. In other words, you don't lift inside with safety straps or full safeties. Rather, you lift off the front with safety spotter arms. I find myself lifting off the front of my power rack often, so half racks are a great alternative.

These typically, but not always, have a smaller footprint and a lower price point. They include a pull-up option and the same holes for attachment configurations.

Wall-Mounted Racks & Folding Racks

Wall-mounted racks, or folding racks, have become very popular in the home gym space. As the name implies, these racks mount to the studs in your wall and fold out when you're ready to lift. These are excellent options if you want to build a garage gym but you still want to park a car in the garage. Another use-case would be building a gym in a small room inside your house.

Wall-mounted racks, like any squat rack, will range in price and features. Most options will provide similar hole specs for attachments, but attachment options are generally limited compared to a power rack or a half rack.

Squat Stands

Squat stands are among the least expensive squat rack options. These include a flat-foot base, which makes them more portable and eliminates the need to bolt down. Depending on which squat stand you buy, it may or may not have a pull-up option. Many of them will include similar hole specs, but attachment options won't be as high as a power rack.

While you may think a squat stand would provide a lot of space savings over a power rack or a half rack, that isn't always the case. You can also purchase independent squat stands, which do save a significant amount of space. These, however, are only used to rack your barbell – versatility is non-existent and you don't get any safety options.

Combo Racks

Combo racks are most commonly seen in powerlifting, specifically, competitive powerlifting. These racks can be configured for the squat or the bench press, and the biggest advantages are safety and adjustment speed. For instance, when you're training multiple athletes of different heights, you can use built-in “jacks” to quickly adjust j-cup positioning. You can also quickly raise or lower the safety height depending on the user.

All-in-One Squat Racks

All-in-One Squat racks, or all-in-one trainers, are highly versatile squat racks that include many different attachments and features. These commonly include cables on both sides to use the rack as a functional trainer. Many of them will have an integrated smith machine in addition to regular uprights for free-weight training. If you want maximum utility in the smallest footprint, these are a contender, but know that they're among the most expensive squat racks available. You should also note that all-in-one trainers can often be “cheap.” If you buy one of these squat racks, buy from a reputable company with strong reviews. Force USA is a great example of a high-quality all-in-one squat rack manufacturer.


Important Factors to Consider when Buying a Squat Rack

Best Squat Racks - Sorinex XL - Garage Gym Lab

The following factors are among the most important based on my experience:

Price

Squat racks can range in price from several hundred dollars to over $10,000 depending on the company, squat rack type, features, customization, etc… I always recommend starting with your budget and working your way down. While I live by the buy-once-cry-once mantra, know that you can always upgrade your squat rack. Many budget-friendly squat racks are functional, safe, and effective.

Footprint

One of the key factors in buying a squat rack is how much space it will take up. Measure your room and decide how much space you want to allocate to your rack. The good news is that there's a squat rack for virtually every imaginable space. You can buy ultra-thin wall-mounted racks up to monstrous six and even eight-post racks. It's also important to factor in height not only for ceiling clearance, but also for pull-up height. For example, a 93″ rack may fit in your 8′ room, but you may hit your head on the ceiling when doing pull-ups.

Tube Size

Tube size is mostly important for structural stability, weight capacity, and attachment compatibility. The most common tube sizes are 2×3 and 3×3 in 11-gauge thickness. These will generally hold 1,000+ pounds. They also come with the most attachment compatibility because many companies manufacture to these specs. You also may find smaller or larger tube sizes (2×2, 4×4, etc…) with thinner or thicker gauge steel (7-gauge, 14-gauge, etc…). I recommend 2×3 or 3×3 (11-gauge) for most people.

Hardware/Hole Size

Hardware size is important for attachment compatibility. The most common sizes are 5/8″ and 1″, although you'll sometimes find 3/4″. All of these are perfectly acceptable from a structural perspective, but compatibility will differ. Consider that 3×3 racks with 1″ holes are becoming the most popular. Companies are spending the most R&D on those racks and they're making the best attachments for them. Still, you can get great quality attachments with other hardware sizes.

Hole Spacing

In addition to hole size, it's important to think about the spacing between them. You'll most commonly see two types of hole sizing. The first is the standard 2″ spacing on center, which is what most manufacturers use. This offers a lot of physical hole options and lets most users find a comfortable position on lifts. The second type is Westside spacing, or 1″ spacing. This is commonly seen on 5/8″ holed racks. The benefit of Westside spacing is that it doubles the hole options and lets lifters find a perfect starting position. Keep in mind that Westside spacing exists only in the bench zone on most racks. Above, there will be 2″ spacing. You may also find 3″ hole spacing on budget squat racks.

Safety Options

Power racks will provide the most safety options, but all squat racks will provide some measure of safety. You will most commonly see pin & pipe safeties come standard on many racks. From there you can upgrade to safety straps, full safety bars, and half/spotter safety arms. I recommend upgrading to one or more of these, as they're easier to set up, they're heavier-duty, they protect your barbells better, and they're much more versatile than pin & pipes.

Weight Capacity

Most squat racks are going to be able to support a lot of weight. I would recommend steering clear of anything incapable of holding 700 lbs, even if you don't lift that much. For example, a 2×2 rack with 14-gauge steel should be rated for 700 lbs, making it a solid budget option. I recommend 2×3 and 3×3 squat racks for most people – these are generally rated to 1,000 lbs+.

Stability

Stability is an extremely important safety consideration. Some racks will require that you bolt them into the ground or a platform. Flat foot racks, six post power racks, half racks, and squat stands typically do not need to be bolted down. Four-post power racks, however, often need to be. If you see on a squat rack's product page that bolting down is recommended, I highly recommend that you do so. That said, there are ways to increase stability through rear stabilizers, front foot extensions, etc… available through the manufacturers. Stability is also important just from a usability perspective. A heavier/larger/bolted down rack will sway less and it will feel more solid.

Attachments/Compatibility

In today's strength equipment environment, versatility is key. Companies are constantly coming up with rack attachments to provide more training variety. Modular racks with front and side holes are highly adaptable and versatile. 2×3 racks with 5/8″ holes and 3×3 racks with 5/8″ or 1″ holes provide the most flexibility when it comes to attachments and compatibility. By compatibility, I mean with other companies. For instance, you can purchase a Rogue squat rack and use Sorinex attachments.

Keep in mind that racks made outside of the USA use the metric system and racks made within the USA use the imperial system. A rack made with the metric system may state that it's 3×3 with 1″ holes, for example, but it's actually 2.95×2.95 with 0.98″ holes. This means that true 3×3, 1″ holed single pin attachments will work, but attachments that span multiple holes may not since the spacing isn't quite the same.

Storage

A great benefit to modular squat racks is that they provide options for plate storage. Half racks and six-post racks are excellent options if you're looking for integrated storage. You can also store plates on some four-post racks, but depending on the depth of the rack, the plates may interfere with some lifts. An additional benefit to plate storage is that it greatly increases the stability of the squat rack.


FAQ's

Best Squat Racks - PR-5000 2 - Garage Gym Lab

Do I Need a Squat Rack for my Home Gym?

I consider a squat rack to be a member of the core four: a rack, a bar, some plates, and a weight bench. While a squat rack isn't necessary for everyone, depending on their training style, it's highly recommended for the vast majority of lifters. Squat racks allow you to perform many lifts efficiently and safely, and they add a lot of training variety overall.

Who Makes the Best Squat Rack?

Many companies produce quality squat racks. Below is a list of some of the top brands:

How Much do Squat Racks Cost?

Squat racks carry a huge price range depending on a variety of factors. You can buy budget/cheap squat racks up to very high-end custom squat racks. The below will show you the target/sweet spot for each type of squat rack, removing low and high options:

  • Power Rack – $600-$2,000
  • Half Rack – $500-$1,500
  • Wall-Mounted/Folding Rack – $400-$1,400
  • Squat Stand – $300-$900
  • Combo Rack – $1,000-$3,500
  • All-in-One Trainer – $2,000-$6,000

So, there you have it – my top-ranked squat racks to buy in 2022!

If you have any questions about squat racks, please leave a comment below. Likewise, if you own any of these squat racks and you want to chime in with your own thoughts, please do so!

If you found this review useful, please feel free to share it on social media!

The bar is loaded,

Adam

Adam
Adam
Adam is the founder of Garage Gym Lab. He serves as the chief content creator with over two decades of training experience. When he's not testing equipment and writing about all things fitness, Adam loves spending time with his wife and two children.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Do you have recommendations for a free standing 4 post rack?

    I’ve been looking at the Rogue RML-390F. My main reservation is the 49 inch width of Rogue racks. Do you know if sandwich J cups completely eliminate this concern, or would it still not be as “forgiving” as a 47 inch width rack?

    • Hey Kevin, the sandwich cups won’t change the clearance issue, unfortunately. If you want to see something with 47” width, check out the Rep Omni Rack. This has a flat base so you don’t have to bolt down and it offers two depth options. Let me know if this helps!

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