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Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Review (2024)

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Quick Overview

The Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes are a quality, budget-friendly heeled lifter. With dual midfoot straps, a TPU midsole, and a 20mm heel height, it provides excellent stability and structure for weightlifting. It has a neutral toe box and runs true to size.

Overall Rating: 8.7/10

Construction: 8.7/10

Stability: 9.1/10

Versatility: 9.0/10

Aesthetics: 7.5/10

Price: 9.2/10

Who It’s Right For

  • Budget shoppers
  • Someone who wants a higher heel
  • Those who want extra support/stability

Things to Consider

  • Upper material lacks breathability
  • Limited colorways

The Do-Win Lifters are some of the best budget weightlifting shoes on the market. These shoes have been around for years and have a strong reputation among beginners and advanced athletes.

Their classic design offers solid performance, and some of the features are typically reserved for higher-end models that are twice as expensive.

Whether you’re a competitive weightlifter or just someone looking to explore the benefits of weightlifting shoes, the Do-Wins have a lot to offer.

And the price is nearly impossible to beat.

However, these shoes have some drawbacks, including the upper material and more.

In this review, we’ll take a close look at the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes. I’ll share the pros and cons and compare them to other popular options, including the Nike Romaleos 4 and Reebok Lifter PR 3 shoes.

Let’s dig in.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes
Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes
Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes
The Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes are affordable lifters with solid performance and features that cater to all levels. They offer premium specs and fit true to size.
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The Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes are an ideal entry-level option because of their price and performance.

When I first tried these shoes, I was pleasantly surprised with how much support they offered, especially compared to other budget shoes.

Dual midfoot straps, a 19mm heel, and a TPU outsole are features commonly found on premium options like the Adipowers and TYR L-1 Lifters.

Most budget options have single straps, lower heels, and EVA outsoles.

I’m very impressed with the overall spec profile of these shoes and feel their performance is quite good.

However, the upper is noticeably less breathable than others, and there are better-looking options out there, in my opinion.

Let’s have a look at the specs and jump into the review.

Specs

  • Heel Height: 19mm (0.75″)
  • Weight: 17 oz (size 10)
  • Straps: Dual
  • Heel Type: TPU
  • Removable Insole: Yes
  • Outsole: Full Rubber
  • Toebox Width: Neutral
  • Sizing: True to Size
  • Colorways: One (Black/White)

Construction

The Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes are generally well-constructed, but some areas aren’t as high-quality as higher-end models. I’m pleased with the reinforced stitching, glue consistency, and metal buckles. However, some material selection, especially the upper, is underwhelming.

Upper

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Upper Construction

These uppers are built with a faux leather material that is fairly stiff and not very breathable. On one hand, I like this material for its durability. It feels premium and capable of handling the demands of lifting heavy weights. I also appreciate the supple texture.

However, on the other hand, it’s not as comfortable as others. In addition to being stiffer and requiring a longer break-in period, the limited breathability creates a hotter shoe. Most others have perforated holes and thinner fabric, allowing air to escape easily. The Do-Wins tend to trap that air, increasing warmth and possibly stench.

That aside, Do-Win includes a comfortable mesh tongue that I like, and I’m impressed with the stitching throughout. I’m not concerned with the long-term durability of the upper.

Midsole and Heel

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Heel

The midsole and heel are the shining stars of the Do-Wins. These shoes use TPU (thermoplastic polyurethane) through the midsole/heel, which is extremely rare at this price point. Most budget options use EVA, which is softer and more compressive.

The benefit of TPU is it provides more support and structure. Its resistance to compression creates a powerful foundation that feels better under heavy loads. If you’re a beginner or recreational lifter, you may not feel a tremendous difference, but as the weights increase, the advantage of TPU over EVA becomes more clear.

Another benefit of the Do-Wins is they have a higher heel height of 19mm, putting them in the same class as higher-end models. Most budget lifters have 12-16mm heights to accommodate a broader range of exercises.

That’s totally fine if you want a versatile shoe for a more generalized approach. But if you want something geared more towards squats and Olympic weightlifting, the 19mm height is better.

Outsole

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Outsole

The Do-Win’s outsole consists of one-piece rubber construction with a recessed bridge showing the midsole. The surface has a pebble grain texture, with a more aggressive pattern toward the forefoot.

I’m pleased with the overall grip of the outsole. It’s not as sticky as some of the more expensive models, but it does a great job of handling various surfaces, from rubber to wood.

Other Features

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Midfoot Straps

One of the standout features of the Do-Wins is the dual midfoot straps. Most budget options, and even some pricier models, only include a single strap. The benefit of dual straps is security and a reduced risk of slippage.

The nylon straps are thick and durable, and I love that they offer complete velcro coverage. Unlike some with only an inch or two of velcro, this allows you full control over tightness.

I’m also a fan of the metal buckles for enhanced durability. Regardless of price, most weightlifting shows have plastic buckles, so this is a premium addition from Do-Win.

Unfortunately, the laces leave a lot to be desired, in my experience. They began fraying pretty quickly, and I don’t care for the feel. Thankfully, they’re easy enough to replace.

Lifting Performance

Squatting in the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes

Compared to other budget choices, I’m a fan of how the Do-Wins perform during conventional weightlifting exercises. Starting with the heel, I love the 19mm height for squats and their variations. I’m able to get into a comfortable position that reminds me of my experiences with more expensive models.

However, this heel height isn’t as good for general gym use. In that context, I prefer the smaller heels of other budget shoes. This includes everything from accessory work to machine-based training. Still, I like the higher height for squat accessories like goblet squats, split squats, etc.

The midfoot straps are a winning feature and something that I greatly appreciate about the Do-Wins. I feel completely locked into these shoes. Coupled with the hard midsole, their support is best-in-class.

Testing the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes

The forefoot of this show is quite rigid – more so than most others I’ve tested. This not only requires a longer break-in period, but I found the lower response felt clunkier on dynamic movements.

Ultimately, these are outstanding performers in the budget class. They shine on squats and do a good job overall on traditional weightlifting movements. Accessory and recreational use are also good, but some may prefer a lower heel.

Aesthetics

Aesthetically, the Do-Wins are some of my least favorite. This is purely subjective, of course, but I find they look too similar to bowling shoes. I don’t mind the classic black-white combination in some ways, but the overall design is fairly distracting.

I would love to see Do-Win offer more color choices like they do with their Classic Lifters. Until then, I don’t see these winning any beauty contests.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Sizing

The Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes have a moderate toe box that leans slightly small. It’s not as tight as most models, but it’s also not truly neutral.

In earlier models, the toe box was slightly wider, and Rogue specifically mentioned sizing down a half-size. They’ve since removed that suggestion, leading me to believe the toe box was taken in.

I suggest ordering true to size. Wide-footed lifters should be safe to order a half-size larger, especially with the mid-foot straps, but I don’t recommend any more than that. Alternatively, I recommend narrow-footed lifters stick with their size rather than sizing down.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes vs. Nike Romaleos 4

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes
Nike Romaleos 4
Product
Product
Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes
Nike Romaleos 4
Price
Price
$95
$200
Heel Height
Heel Height
19mm (0.75")
20mm (0.75")
Strap
Strap
Dual
Dual
Fit
Fit
Neutral
Narrow
Size
Size
True to Size
Runs Small

The Nike Romaleos 4 are a high-end weightlifting shoe with premium features and a higher price. These shoes have one of the strongest reputations in weightlifting and have been used on the platform for years.

The biggest difference between the Romaleos and Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes is the price. While you can buy the Do-Wins for less than $100, the Romaleos 4 will set you back ~$200, not including any sales.

Spec-wise, the Do-Wins have a 19mm heel vs. a 20mm heel on the Nikes. Both are great elevations for squatting, but some may appreciate the taller heel, especially front squatters and Olympic weightlifters. However, powerlifters may enjoy the shorter heel for low-bar squats.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes vs Nike Romaleos 4

Both shoes have hard TPU midsoles for a firm foundation. I’ve found the Do-Wins are more rigid in the forefoot, while the Nikes are more responsive for dynamic movements. Each shoe has dual straps, but I prefer the Do-Wins for the extra velcro coverage nylon construction.

While both shoes have a grippy, full rubber outsole for solid traction, the Nikes have an interesting winged design. With a slightly wider heel and midfoot, the Nikes provide excellent lateral stability for Olympic weightlifting.

In terms of size, the Romaleos run notoriously tight, so they aren’t a good option for wide-footed users. I recommend sizing up a half-size in the Nikes, whereas Do-Wins run much more true to size.

Ultimately, these are two quality weightlifting shoes, but the Romaleos 4 are superior. If you’re a serious lifter with a bigger budget, I recommend them. However, budget shoppers, recreational lifters, and beginners will still see great results with the Do-Win shoes at a lower price.

Further reading: Nike Romaleos 4 Review

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes vs. Adidas Powerlift 5

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes
Adidas Powerlift 5
Product
Product
Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes
Adidas Powerlift 5
Price
Price
$95
$120
Heel Height
Heel Height
19mm (0.75")
16mm (0.63")
Strap
Strap
Dual
Single
Fit
Fit
Neutral
Narrow/Neutral
Size
Size
True to Size
Runs Small

The Adidas Powerlift 5 is another budget-friendly weightlifting shoe. These have a different spec profile than the Do-Wins, making them more versatile but less sport-specific.

Starting with the heel, the Powerlifts have a 16mm heel vs 19mm on the Do-Wins. The higher heel promotes a better squat position, allowing people to go deeper and squat with a more upright chest. 3mm may not seem like a big difference, but it can be meaningful for advanced lifters.

Another big difference between these shoes is that the Do-Wins have a TPU midsole. Most shoes in this class, like the Powerlift 5’s, have a more compressive EVA midsole. TPU creates a more stable foundation, making them a better choice for heavier lifts.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes vs. Adidas Powerlift 5

The Do-Win shoes also provide more midfoot security through dual straps than only a single strap on the Powerlifts. Combined with a heavier overall build, the Do-Wins feel more stable.

That aside, the Powerlifts are better for general gym use and are still quite good for squats. I find them more comfortable and breathable than the Do-Wins, and I greatly prefer the aesthetic.

Before buying a budget pair of weightlifting shoes, ask yourself what you’re looking for. If you want a higher heel and are going for heavy traditional lifts, I recommend the Do-Wins. However, if you want an all-purpose shoe with performance benefits over conventional cross-trainers, the Adidas Powerlift 5s are a great choice.

Further reading: Adidas Powerlifts 5 Review

User Reviews

The Do-Win Lifters are some of the most heavily reviewed weightlifting shoes on the market, likely because of their favorable price point.

Most reviews are positive, as evidenced by a 4.6/5 from hundreds of reviewers at Rogue. Users love the support, stability, and performance, especially on squats. Critical reviews mainly point to sizing, with a narrow toe box being the biggest point of contention. Again, I recommend most people order true to size or maybe a half-size larger if they have wide feet.

Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Excellent price for quality shoes
  • Dual midfoot straps for extra support
  • TPU midfoot/heel provides a firm foundation
  • Grippy rubber outsole
  • 19mm heel is higher than most budget options

Cons

  • Upper material lacks breathability
  • Shoe laces aren’t very durable
  • Limited color choices

Final Thoughts

The Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes are an excellent choice for budget shoppers and those looking to test a heeled shoe.

I love how Do-Win included premium features on a budget option, including a 19mm heel, TPU midsole, and dual straps.

However, the stiffer upper isn’t as breathable as others, and I don’t care for the look as much as others.

Still, the performance is strong overall. If you like the idea of a higher heel and firmer foundation but don’t want to spend much money, the Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes are the best choice.

Do-Win Weightlifting Shoes Rating

Construction: 8.7/10

Stability: 9.1/10

Versatility: 9.0/10

Aesthetics: 7.5/10

Price: 9.2/10

Final Verdict

Overall: 8.7/10

Adam Hensley
Adam Hensley
Adam is the founder of Garage Gym Lab and has over two decades of fitness/training experience. He serves as the chief content creator and runs our YouTube channel and social media accounts. When he's not testing equipment or sharing his love for home gym life, you'll find him with his wife and two kids in sunny South Carolina.
Adam Hensley
Adam Hensley
Adam is the founder of Garage Gym Lab and has over two decades of fitness/training experience. He serves as the chief content creator and runs our YouTube channel and social media accounts. When he's not testing equipment or sharing his love for home gym life, you'll find him with his wife and two kids in sunny South Carolina.

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